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2018 C3 US-Arab Healthcare & Business Summit
We welcome you to continue developing relationships,
both existing and new; or to discover this event for the first time.

Monday, September 24th, 2018

U.S. and Arab relations rooted in commerce and enterprise are historic and grounded in tradition and mutual interest. These unique relations across the Atlantic have influenced and shaped strategic healthcare partnerships, strengthened alliances, supported B2B and public-private partnerships.

The C3 U.S. – Arab Healthcare & Business Summit 2018 will assemble business leaders, policy makers, educators and healthcare professionals from the Arab world and the United States to bolster and promote U.S. and Arab world initiatives that are focused on the most up-to-date healthcare topics including infrastructure, the shift from communicable diseases, the future of primary healthcare, and cooperative assistance for knowledge transfer.

In short, the C3 U.S. – Arab Healthcare & Business Summit 2018 will address resources, research and access to the best healthcare services in order to improve survival from disease and the quality of life based on the exchange of knowledge and employment opportunities between the two regions.

AGENDA – Subject to Change

7:30 am - 9:00 am
Room: Main Lounge
(First Floor)

C3 Summit

Registration, Exhibit Review & Continental Breakfast

C3 Summit
The Union League Club
38 East 37th Street / S.E. Corner of Park & 37th/ Entrance on 37th Street
New York, New York
212-685-3800
Map/Directions

Founded in 1863 by a group of concerned citizens to help preserve the Union, the Union League Club of New York has built, over ensuing years, a record of distinguished service to our country. Members of The Union League Club were instrumental in establishing The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1870 as well as the Sanitary Commission, a predecessor organization to the American Red Cross. It helped erect the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor and the Lincoln Monument in Union Square. Its members were instrumental in bringing down the "Boss" Tweed ring and in raising funds to outfit American soldiers in several conflicts.

Many prominent civic, state and national leaders have enjoyed the fellowship of the ULC. Theodore Roosevelt managed his early political career from the Club's chambers. J. Pierpont Morgan was a regular, along with John Jay, William Cullen Bryant, Chester A. Arthur, and Thomas Nast. Fifteen Presidents, seven Senators, many Congressmen, diplomats, cabinet members, and scores of CEOs of major corporations have been members of the Club during the past hundred and fifty years and have participated in its programs.

8:00 am - 9:00 am
Room: Blair Suite
(Mezzanine)

C3 Summit

Aetna Round Table Insights
Increasing Investments in the Healthcare Sector

(By Invitation Only)

Speaker: Aetna International Vice President

9:00 am - 9:10 am

C3 Summit

Cook Children's Health Care System

2018 C3 US-Arab Healthcare & Business Summit
Welcoming Remarks:
Moving Healthcare, Commerce and Philanthropy Beyond Bilateral Borders

Mr. Ransel N. Potter,
Founder & Managing Partner,
C3 Summit International

Ms. Cynthia Gonzalez,
Executive Director,
International Patient Services,
Cook Children's Healthcare System,
USA

Simply stated, the 2018 C3 US-Arab Healthcare & Business Summit is about exploring ideas, suggestions, and realistic recommendations as possible solutions to today's bilateral security, technology, commercial development and healthcare challenges. Based on the insights of the Summit's global leaders and thinkers, on the importance of "moving healthcare, commerce and philanthropy beyond bilateral borders," participants can begin to immediately implement what they will hear and learn to help bring these innovations, pilot projects, cases studies, public-private partnerships and other practical solutions to fruition in the global commercial and healthcare sectors.

9:10 am - 10:10 am
Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

Cook Children's Health Care System

2018 C3 US-Arab Healthcare & Business Summit
Opening Plenary:
Improving the Child-Patient Experience
Judi Hershman,
(Moderator),
Founder,
Raftr Communications
&
Sangha Wellness,
USA
Ms. Cynthia Gonzalez,
Executive Director,
International Patient Services,
Cook Children's Healthcare System,
USA
Mr. Stan Davis,
Senior Vice President & COO,
Cook Children's Health Care System,
USA
Ms. Cheryl Petersen,
Vice President & CNO,
Cook Children's Medical Center,
USA
Ms. Jill Koss,
Director,
Family Support Services,
Cook Children's Medical Center,
USA
Dr. Pamela Sherman,
Medical Director,
International Patient Services and Director;
Hand Surgery Program,
Cook Children’s Medical Center,
USA

Improving the patient experience for children and young people is a subject which has not always received the attention and investment that it needs to make serious progress. Whatever the outcome, any patient experience is a fundamental component of how healthcare professionals should think about the quality of services delivered to, and received by, the patient. Yet children and/or their parents may often feel that the healthcare needs of younger people are marginalized compared to older patients. Therefore, the ongoing review of a child's patient experience, within the overall healthcare environment, is vital and deserves continuous attention and improvement.

That said, an increasing body of research evidence illustrates how delivering a positive patient experience in child healthcare can improve medical outcomes. For example, reducing stress and anxiety strengthens the immune system, which in turn impacts infection and recovery rates. Additionally, compliance with treatment programs and long term outcomes can be enhanced through effective communication and inspiring trust and confidence, especially in children. In short, if an institution is to fully embody a mission to improving the patient experience of a child, it cannot merely provide a medical service and/or solution - it must also deliver thoughts, feelings and outcomes that are inextricably linked to those of a young person. To this end, involving children and young people, in all decisions that affect them, is key. Especially given the importance of finding kid-friendly ways to ensure that children and young people feel heard, acknowledged and respected. Other considerations, for a positive child-patient experience, should also address the "living" environment of a hospital's surroundings: does it exude happiness and comfort, rather than appearing outdated and uninviting. It has been scientifically proven that colors, natural lighting, and furnishings/decorations affect a person's moods in many different ways. For example, paying attention to seating options, privacy and technology can all generate a more positive and productive child-patient experience.

In light of the above, the objective of this panel is to examine and discuss practical solutions creating a positive patient experience for children and young people. More than just an endpoint of care, it should be the start of improving the overall patient experience of a child. Understandably, by embedding this requisite into the entire culture of an organization, no matter where children interact within the healthcare system, it could ultimately become a big "ask" in the current economic environment. However, if successful, the outcomes deliver a far better personal, patient experience, thereby providing a far better medical result and financial return, for both the child and the healthcare provider.

**Cook Children’s Health Care System is an 11 company, pediatrics only, integrative health care system with a 445 bed Medical Center as it’s cornerstone. Known for expert care and highly advanced medical technologies, Cook Children's Medical Center serves patients from all over the world. While our extraordinary doctors, nurses and amazing technology deliver groundbreaking treatments, we never forget that it all comes down to the one child that matters most: yours. https://www.cookchildrens.org/about/international-program/Pages/default.aspx

10:10 am - 10:20 am

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Session Break / Exhibit Review

Sponsored by:

Brigham and Women's Hospital

10:20 am - 11:20 am
Room: Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Harvard School of Public Health

Global Healthcare Workforce Development: How Knowledge Transfer, Technology & Educational Training Address This Critical Need
Mr. Steven J. Thompson,
(Moderator),
Senior Vice President,
Chief Business Development Officer,
Brigham and Women's Healthcare,
USA
Dr. Charles Pozner,
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine,
Harvard Medical School,
Brigham and Women's Hospital,
USA
Ms. Madelyn Pearson,
Chief Nursing Officer,
Senior Vice President Patient Care Services,
Brigham and Women's Hospital,
USA
Dr. Allen Kachalia,
Chief Quality Officer,
Vice President for Quality and Safety,
Harvard Medical School,
Brigham and Women's Healthcare,
USA
Dr. Douglas S. Smink,
Associate Professor in Surgery,
Harvard Medical School,
General Surgeon of Minimally Invasive Surgery,
Brigham and Women's Hospital,
USA

A WHO report projects a global shortage of more than 12.9 million nurses and other health workers by 2035. That figure today stands at 7 million. As a result, trained healthcare workers are stretched dangerously thin. And the average ratio of doctors to population in the Gulf countries is 20 doctors per 10,000 people, compared to around 40 per 10,000 in Europe. This panel will discuss how bilateral cooperation between regions, and beyond, is expanding and improving access to healthcare services. That said, a "health team" approach, with services that are more equitably distributed through health workforces that include community health workers, coupled with widespread access to technology, is bringing better care to those in need.

This panel will address the contribution of medical simulation in the areas of:
- Medical Education: Too much to know, not enough time to learn... there must be a better way
- Nursing Education: Primary education; Assessing competence; Addressing skills degradation
- Interprofessional Training: Confronting miscommunication as a major contributor to avoidable medical errors; Instituting team training in an academic medical center
- Patient Safety: Identification of latent safety threats; Investigation and remediation of sentinel events

11:20 am - 11:30 am

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Session Break / Exhibit Review

Sponsored by:

Brigham and Women's Hospital

11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Track 1
Room: Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

UC San Diego Health System

American Mission Hospital

Pure Life

Pure Life

Preventable Medical Care: The Science of Improving Quality of Life Against the Battle of Disease
Dr. Daniele Rigamonti,
(Moderator),
CEO,
Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Dr. George Cheriyan,
Corporate CEO,
Chief Medical Officer,
American Mission Hospital,
Kingdom of Bahrain
Mr. John Payne,
Chairman & CEO,
PURELIFE Health Sciences Group, LLC,
USA
Dr. Felicia Hill-Briggs
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine;
Bloomberg School of Public Health;
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing;
Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC
USA
Dr. J. Hunter Young,
Medical Director
Patient Services;
Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology
Johns Hopkins Medicine International
USA
Mr. Angelo DiMaggio,
CEO/Founder,
American BackPain Center,
American Headache Institute,
USA

Preventive medical care includes all healthcare services intended to prevent illness, detect health problems before any symptoms occur, and reduce the damage caused by symptomatic diseases. It is known that 70% of all healthcare costs are direct results of behavior, and that 74% of all costs are confined to four chronic conditions: cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Furthermore, 80% of cardiovascular disease and diabetes is preventable, and 90% of obesity is preventable. The #1 and #2 causes of disability in the USA and UAE respectively, are neck/back pain and migraine. Studies show headaches to be the #1 cause of lost productivity in the workplace with the UAE having the highest prevalence of migraine in the world. Preventive healthcare strategies take place at the primal, primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention levels.

A number of studies have shown that preventive medicine is a good investment. Services of daily aspirin use; tobacco cessation support; diet and exercise; cancer screening; immunization; and illegal substance screening for example can potentially save thousands of lives and millions of dollars annually. Headache and migraine prevention is possible with patient self-treatment. Our panel of professionals will discuss the logistical and procedural considerations of integrating preventative solutions.

11:30 am - 12:30 pm
Track 2
Room: Main Lounge
(First Floor)

Cleveland Clinic

The Impact of Philanthropy on a Global Healthcare System
Dr. Maan Fares,
(Moderator),
Vice Chairman,
Global Patient Services,
The Cleveland Clinic,
USA
Mr. Bishoy M. Mikhail,
Associate Chairman,
Philanthropy Institute,
Oversight International Development,
The Cleveland Clinic,
USA
Dr. Omneya A. Darwish,
Vice President for Global Outreach and Engagement,
Egypt;
Smart Consult,
USA
Dr. Faisal Zagzoog,
Otolaryngology-Head and Neck,
King Abdulaziz University,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Ms. Paige Peterson,
Executive Vice President,
Huntsman Cancer Foundation,
USA

In recent years, the field of global health has been moving away from donor-funded international initiatives on individual diseases, and toward mostly domestically-financed investments in universal healthcare, quality health systems, and achieving health for all. Yet, the role of philanthropy in this transition remains a work in progress. Whether they support patients and their families psychologically or morally, advocate for their rights, fund research and healthcare infrastructure or support innovative initiatives at the local level, philanthropic organizations contribute significantly to the healthcare system. That said, global health funders are keenly aware of how poor health detrimentally affects developing countries around the globe.

Some of the world's most deadly diseases are also the most preventable and treatable. People regularly die from illnesses like diarrhea and those caused by parasites, not because treatments don't exist, but because they don't have access to things like clean water, vaccinations, and healthcare clinics. Meanwhile, basic needs often go unmet in areas like reproductive health. Funders in this space take a wide range of approaches, including researching new vaccines, bolstering systems for healthcare delivery, and providing new medical technology.

12:40 pm - 2:00 pm
Room: Main Dining
(Third Floor)

Brigham and Women's Hospital

C3 Summit

World Health Organization


Brigham and Women's Hospital


American Mission Hospital


Sultonate of Oman

Luncheon Sponsor: Brigham Health
C3 Welcoming Remarks & Award Presentation - Luncheon Address/Buffett

Mr. Ransel N. Potter,
Founder & Managing Partner,
C3 Summit International,
USA

Dr. Rana Hajjeh,
Director,
Department of Communicable Diseases,
Eastern Mediterranean Region;
EMRO RD Candidate,
World Health Organization,
Egypt

C3 Global Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient and Keynote Address:

Dr. B. R. Shetty,
Founder & Chairman/CEO,
NMC Healthcare,
Abu Dhabi

C3 Global Visionary Award Recipient:

Dr. George Cheriyan,
Corporate CEO,
Chief Medical Officer,
on behalf of:
American Mission Hospital,
Kingdom of Bahrain

C3 Global Women Empowerment Award Recipient:

Ms. Zainab Salbi,
Founder: Women for Women International,
Author: 'Freedom Is an Inside Job,'
TV Host,
Iraq/USA

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Track #1
Room: Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

Cleveland Clinic

C3 Summit

C3 Summit

C3 Summit

World Health Organization

Unhealthy Lifestyles: Public Healthcare Challenges Facing Middle East from Western Influence
Dr. Nizar N. Zein,
(Moderator),
Director,
Hepatology Center,
Chairman,
Global Patient Services,
The Cleveland Clinic,
USA
Dr. Stella George,
Head of Americas Care Management,
Aetna International,
USA
Dr. Sameh El-Saharty,
Program Manager
&
Human Development,
GCC Countries & Mena Region,
The World Bank,
Egypt
Ms. Tuba Terekli,
Saudi Arabia High Commissioner
of
World Business Angels' Forum,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Dr. Ahmed Emara,
CEO & Managing Director,
ReAya Holding,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Dr. Asmus Hammerich,
Director,
Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health,
World Health Organization,
Eastern Mediterranean Region,
Egypt

Rapid globalization and urbanization are contributing to four main types of healthcare issues in the Middle East: cardiovascular diseases (heart attacks and stroke), cancers, chronic respiratory diseases (such as chronic obstructed pulmonary disease and asthma) and diabetes. These diseases are driven by factors that include aging, rapid unplanned urbanization, and the globalization of unhealthy lifestyles. Among the latter are unhealthy diets, tobacco use, lack of physical activity and obesity that may lead to raised blood pressure, increased blood glucose levels, and elevated blood lipids. What are some potential solutions to counter these concerns will be the focus of this panel.

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Track #2
Room: Main Lounge
(First Floor)

Women, Education & Careers in the Middle East: A Modern Conflict Between the Future & the Past
Ms. Zainab Salbi,
(Moderator),
Founder: Women for Women International,
Author: 'Freedom Is an Inside Job,'
TV Host,
Iraq/USA
Ms. Jasmine Nahhas di Florio,
Senior Vice President,
Strategy & Partnerships,
Education For Employment (EFE),
USA
Ms. Nahlah Al Jubier,
Director,
Center for Career Development,
Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Ms. Tuba Terekli,
Saudi Arabia High Commissioner
of
World Business Angels' Forum,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Miriam Oueslati Khiari,
President,
Islamic Heritage, Inc.,
USA/Tunisia
Ms. Ruma Bose,
Consultant, Serial Entrepreneur, Investor,
Philanthropist,
Author,
USA
Ms. Tala Al Jabri,
Fellow.
Harvard University;
Strategy & Finance Advisor,
USA/KSA

It is practically impossible to discuss women's education in the Arab region without introducing the social and political forces that have shaped their status, not only in education but in society in general. That said, the future for women's education and career plans must be able to tackle problems of increased economic demands, segregation of the sexes, limitations of women's jobs and the cultural and religious heritage of "biased" treatment. If the region plans to survive this globalized era, then women's education and professional prospects, in all fields, should be a priority.

Given the apparent variability in perspective of educated and open-minded individuals who are seeking progress, and the attitudes of some conservative religious scholars and old traditions, which resist any movement forward, it is difficult to predict. Until then, women's issues, regarding their social/professional development, will be at the center of conflict between the region's past constrictions, future promise and influential outliers that represent today's generational change.

3:00 pm - 3:10 pm

C3 Summit

Session Break / Exhibit Review

Sponsored by:

C3 Summit

3:10 pm - 4:10 pm
Track #1
Room: Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

Pure Life

Understanding the Impact of Equality, Diversity and Policy on a Progressive Middle East
Dr. Herbert L. London,
(Moderator),
President,
London Center for Policy Research,
USA
Dr. John Duke Anthony,
President & CEO,
National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations (NCUSAR),
USA
Mr. Nawaf Althari,
Political Adviser,
Counter-Terrorism,
Counter-Piracy Focal Point,
OIC Focal Point,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,
Permanent Mission to the United Nations,
USA
Mr. Ron Bruder,
Founder & Chairman,
Education for Employment (EFE),
USA
Ambassador Marc Ginsberg,
Former US Ambassador,
Morocco
Mr. H. Delano Roosevelt,
Director,
New Business Development,
Reza Investment Group,
Kingdom of Bahrain

The Middle East is a region that includes eighteen nations and is home to at least twelve languages. Making generalizations about any policy that will impact equality and/or diversity, creates inaccuracies, as there are usually exceptions to every rule. However, one statement that can safely be made about the region is that it plays an increasingly important role in world affairs, be it a political and/or economic influence. As a region it is fraught with diversity, from equality to inequality. For this reason, the lack of any well defined or unified policy continues to steer the Middle East on its own timed destruction; which is taking place slowly but surely.

During the next two or three decades, or even more, the region could see the irreversible deconstruction of any progressive change prior to the emergence of a new region that will be totally different and totally metamorphosed into numerous small states created either along sectarian or ethnic identity lines. Therefore, the impact of equality and diversity is fundamental for making public policies that lead to a strong civil society. It fosters a respect for the rights, dignity and privileges of all people, while assuming that they fulfill their responsibilities within their society, which will be the focus of this panel.

3:10 pm - 4:10 pm
Track #2
Room: Main Lounge
(Second Floor)

Pure Life

Pure Life

The Cancer Trust

From Cancer to Diabetes: How Artificial Intelligence is Helping Solve These Healthcare Challenges in the
US & Middle East
Dr. John Lantis,
(Moderator),
Vice Chairman, Department of Surgery,
Chief of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery,
Mount Sinai,
USA
Dr. Khawla S. Al-Kuraya,
Professor of Pathology,
Director,
Research Centre at KFNCCC,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,
KSA
Dr. Ghassan Abou-Alfa,
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center,
Chair Heatobiliary Task Force,
National Cancer Institute,
Lebanon & USA
Ms. Katherine Bazemore,
CEO,
Cocoon Resources, Inc.,
USA
Dr. Aftab Ahmed,
Vice President,
PureLife Health Sciences Group,
USA
Mr. Duncan Darrow,
Founder & Chairman,
The Cancer Trust,
USA

Innovation, such as Artificial Intelligence, can help the healthcare sector address and overcome current and future challenges. For instance, the treatment and prevention of rare and dangerous diseases like cancer and diabetes often depends on detecting the symptoms at the right time. In many cases, early diagnosis can result in complete cure. Conversely, a late or wrong diagnosis can have damaging or potentially fatal results. Human skills and experience are limited and hard to perfect when it comes to examining images and samples and, more importantly, making reliable decisions. For that reason, today, AI is having its own go at fighting diabetes and cancer. That said, current oncology platforms are especially adept at analyzing both structured and unstructured data. Simply stated, today's AI technology can ingest enormous amounts of clinical trial data and medical journal entries, from which it can then determine cancer patterns, with a comprehensive list of effective therapies and treatment options.

Even with diabetes, Artificial Intelligence is set to play a key role in the goal for a world without type 1 diabetes. Currently, more than a million people have T1D in America alone and there is currently no cure. Nearly 40,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in the U.S. this year. In the Middle East, diabetes rates have reached a record high of 48 million cases, accounting for nearly 15% of its adults, the highest level in the world. And each new patient creates new records and new data points. If leveraged correctly, this data could provide additional understanding of the disease to help unlock the insights hidden in this massive data set. The outcome would be to advance the field of precision medicine towards the prevention and management of diabetes and cancer on a global scale.

4:10 pm - 4:20 pm

Session Break / Exhibit Review

Sponsored by:

4:20 pm - 5:20 pm
Track #1
Room: Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

How Blockchain Will Help Meet the Growing Demand for New Healthcare Solutions
Mr. Ryan Olohan,
(Moderator),
Managing Director,
Healthcare,
Google,
USA
Mr. Olivier Jarry,
Managing Partner,
Imagiance LLC,
United Kingdom
Mr. Jared Josleyn,
Global Head of Corporate Development,
Verily Life Sciences,
USA
Mr. Alan Gilbert,
Chief Growth Officer,
V3 Health Strategy,
USA
Mr. Omar Darwazah,
General Partner,
Arab Angel Fund,
USA

The age of information is upon us... and blockchain has the potential to act as the heart and the blood vessels for data to flow. It is a means for effective and continuous communication and data transfer. Currently, a lot of problems prevail in the field of medicine because it lacks a uniform, reliable and transparent method for storing and retrieving sensitive information. In research and development of new medications and medical procedures, the storage and flow of information is an integral step. By using blockchain, instead of conventional means, the data stored can be verified by experts and without fear of information corruption by any party. Private health records of a patient could be made available instantly and securely to all doctors in all hospitals, making treatment more accessible, especially in case of emergencies.

Blockchain will allow for greater confidence in health information exchange, and this would allow organizations to collaborate to understand healthcare trends. Furthermore, healthcare providers would have an easier time identifying trends, which could have an impact on population health management and patient care. Hospitals need good, reliable, and timely data, but they also need the ability to share data and information across organizations. A common digital database would allow those in healthcare to easily access shared information at a faster rate. Therefore, blockchain would improve data governance because it would allow for greater trust in data, achieve greater ownership in the data, improve interoperability, and result in better data-driven decision making. Simply stated, blockchain will revolutionize healthcare and providers need to start preparing for this disruptive technology.

4:20 pm - 5:20 pm
Track #2
Room: Main Lounge
(Second Floor)

Cleveland Clinic

World Health Organization

C3 Summit

C3 Summit

Egypt: Stability and Scale as a New MENA Hub for Technology, Healthcare & Drug Development
Mr. Fady Yacoub,
(Moderator)

Managing Partner HOF Capital,
Egypt & USA
Mr. Hassan Shabrawichi,
Chairman & CEO,
AXA Africa Holding,
Egypt
Dr. Ashraf El Fiky MD PHD,
President and Chief Scientist,
Smart Consult,
USA and Egypt
Dr. Rana Hajjeh,
Director,
Department of Communicable Diseases
Eastern Mediterranean Region
World Health Organization
EMRO RD Candidate
Egypt
Dr. Sameh El-Saharty,
Program Manager
&
Human Development,
GCC Countries & Mena Region,
The World Bank,
Egypt
Mr. Steve Lutes,
Vice President,
Middle East Affairs,
U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Today's Egypt is tomorrow's opportunity for GCC companies, global and regional healthcare systems and pharmaceutical manufacturers wanting to deploy and/or expand their businesses/hospitals and drug development and distribution. For example, the Middle East and the North Africa (MENA) region constitute just 2% of global pharmaceutical sales. A rapid increase in population has ignited drug demand especially for higher-yield pharmaceutical products attracting the attention of multinational pharmaceutical companies. The region now competes with Asia and Latin American countries in terms of the projected growth in its local pharmaceutical industries. Of the 22 countries in the region, Saudi Arabia and Egypt stand out as the largest markets in terms of projected growth potential and value representing a host of opportunities for biotech, drug and innovative healthcare technologies.

The diverse economic conditions and potential business sectors offer both established and start up businesses, with tech enabled scale, a large and low cost computer programmer population to leverage. Coupled with shifting disease profiles, the fight to improve global healthcare needs, in addition to effective public health measures, requires rapid and efficient technologies for the development of new diagnostic tools; new vaccines and drugs; low-cost restoration of water, soil and other natural resources; and, efficient delivery methods and novel approaches to therapeutics.

This session will bring together pharmaceutical business leaders, policy makers, technology innovators and regulatory executives from the US and GCC to address how innovations in science and technology, together with a favorable regulatory environment for the pharmaceutical and technology sectors, have resulted in improved health, quality of life, and a rise in life expectancy worldwide.

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm
Room: Lincoln Hall
(Second Floor)

C3 Summit

2018 C3 US - Arab Healthcare & Business Summit
Closing Remarks:
Moving Healthcare, Commerce and Philanthropy Beyond Bilateral Borders

Mr. Isaac Blech,
Founder, Director,
Cerecor;
Founder of:
Celgene; ICOS (developer of Cialis);
Nova Pharmaceutical; Pathogenesis;
Genetics Systems Corporation;
USA

More than ever before, globalization is becoming a reality with the world becoming more interconnected through social media and internet in areas like economy, energy, environment, security and healthcare. Considering "healthcare diplomacy" has become a valuable "commercial" commodity to bring people and countries together to win the fight against disease and death, the 2018 C3 US-Arab Healthcare & Business Summit has focused on how best to capture and help grow this global healthcare market by building a cohesive global business community through bilateral cooperation.

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Room: Main Dining Room
(Third Floor)

Brigham and Women's Hospital

2018 C3 US-Arab Healthcare & Business Networking Reception

Welcoming Remarks:

Mr. Steven J. Thompson,
Senior Vice President,
Chief Business Development Officer,
Brigham and Women’ s Healthcare,
USA

Music By
Mr. Robert May, Pianist

We would like to thank our sponsors and our affiliates